Saturday, August 6, 2022

Jarman rises again and wins his third gold medal at the Commonwealth Games

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There’s an aura about Jake Jarman right now. The young English gymnast rose high again to claim a third gold medal as he continues to take these Commonwealth Games by storm.

A huge beaming smile spread across the 20-year-old’s face after he completed an impeccable floor exercise at Arena Birmingham with a score of 14.666. A puff of smoke after folding his hands after so much precision: the realization of even more untapped potential and the springboard to a career that promises to be a special one.

Jarman firmly believes in retaining an element of fun, an integral part of his medal success, but confirmation by a brilliant team gold before edging teammate James Hall for the all-around title on Sunday propelled him to even greater glory here parquet .

“I can say without a doubt that this was probably the best exercise I’ve done in my gymnastics career,” Jarman said afterwards. “I’ve done a lot of ground qualifications at major competitions; Unfortunately I made a few mistakes.

“Getting into that final, getting into a final at all is amazing, delivering a routine when it really counts, it means so much to me.”

There was an expectation that Jarman would deliver, yet any slip of his newfound brilliance would be ruthlessly exposed after Felix Dolci posted an impressive, pace-setting 14.166 score to start the floor final. The Canadian delivered a typically stylish routine after battling for a medal in fourth place in the all-around final. That impressive performance made him a daunting target, but he was there to shoot him from the start and Jarman proved deadly, posting a stunning 14.666 on the highest difficulty to blow away the competition and his ground routine off the all-around final (14,000 ). Dolci opted for silver, bronze for England’s Giarnni Regini-Moran, who spoke enthusiastically about Jarman’s rise.

“Jake is just amazing,” he said. “He’s the kid on the team and last year he needed a bit of guidance. But he stayed with us, the elders. He’s amazing, he’s worked so hard. He deserves it.”

Jarman is characterized by blurring speed when turning and the additional crack and explosion when it hits the ground. After taking a breath at the end of the exercise, the silence was broken by a roar of applause that soon turned into a roar as Jarman straightened his stance into a triple somersault after a sublime backflip. A nervous wait ensued, but Jarman’s thumbs-up emphasized his newfound physique and comfort level on the big stage. Jarman is now confident in the finer details and has recognized what it takes to achieve greatness.

“The hardest part is actually hitting the landings,” Jarman pointed out. “Most of the time on a floor routine you’re going to score by more or less landing the falls, but landing the falls without kicking is what really counts in a final. The best gymnasts in the world on the floor, they’ll take as many falls as they can.”

If Jarman has taken the online hype and amazement of five-twist jumps in training to the big stage, it’s thanks to his support team, with his grandma, Sheila Jarman, receiving special credit for regularly allowing him to be honing his craft during his formative years.

“My grandma was always there to take me to the gym when my parents were busy; seeing her sitting on the balcony in Huntingdon,’ he said. “I feel like I’m of an age where I can truly appreciate the sacrifices she made to get me here.

“As a kid, you don’t think about these things and you take the time to do things for yourself. Now that I think about it, I don’t know where I would be.”

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