Saturday, January 22, 2022

Petrified Asshole gives insight into dinosaur sex, including mating signal

- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -


A dinosaur cesspool has been found in good enough condition for paleontologists and biologists to recreate a three-dimensional model of a 120-million-year-old dinosaur

Archaeologists have uncovered some of the secrets of dinosaur sex after uncovering some unusually well-preserved private parts.

Jakob Vinther, a paleontologist working at the University of Bristol, found what he called a “dinosaur asshole” while working with the Natural History Museum in Senckenberg, Germany.

The body part’s shape and color revealed how the 120-million-year-old dinosaur might have made its mating calls.

Vinther said, “I thought I was wondering if anyone has ever found a dinosaur cloaca?”

A cloaca is an opening common to all vertebrates that functions as a one-size-fits-all for sex, pooping, urination, and reproduction, Popsci reports.

In a recently published study, paleoartist Robert Nicholls and biologist Diane A. Kelly were able to reconstruct a cloaca in three dimensions.

The reconstruction was able to describe what Vinther says is the only non-avian-dinosaur cloaca known to survive.

He says the sewer is “more than just an asshole,” adding that it’s “the Swiss army knife of butts.”

To help with their work, Vinther says the study’s authors looked at the widespread cloaca of other land-dwelling vertebrates.

The dinosaur owner of this particular cesspool is an approximately 120-million-year-old Psittacosaurus from what is now Liaoning Province in northeast China.

The Psittacosaurus was about the size of a Labrador and surprisingly cute for a dinosaur, Vinther says, with scaly horns on either side of its flat, ET-like face.

The dinosaur’s cloaca appears to have a distinct color that could be used to signal mates, as birds sometimes do.

Co-author Diane Kelly, an expert in the evolution of copulation systems, said: “The shape and color of the tissue obtained suggests that these animals may have used both olfactory and visual cues to interact with other members of their species. “

Vinther notes that these revelations won’t “cure cancer,” but add a small piece to the puzzle of what life used to be like.

- Advertisement -
Latest news
- Advertisement -
Related news
- Advertisement -

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here